The Positive Power of Pets

Second Hand Hounds Feature - Sun50

The Positive Power of Pets

Donni Torres runs the Puppy Party Program for Secondhand Hounds, a Minnesota-based animal rescue. Donni has been a foster with the organization for seven years and has helped dogs of all breeds, ages, sizes, and backgrounds find their forever homes. Sheltering in place is isolating and with so many people spending more time outdoors, we thought it made sense to explore the world of pet adoption to see if this may be a good fit for your lifestyle.

Perhaps you’ve realized you will be home more than usual this winter and you may be thinking, “now is THE perfect time to add a fur friend to my family.”  Afterall, dogs have been known to cure loneliness, increase your opportunity to be outside, exercise and socialize, from a six-foot distance of course!

So how do you start?

First of all, figure out the best dog addition for your lifestyle and be honest with yourself.

BREED: Are you looking for a running partner or a couch potato? A brewpub mate, boater, or road trip dog? Visit dog parks and ask the owner questions or just observe. Visit websites like Secondhand Hounds or Petfinder to see what’s available in your area. Research breeds of interest so you know what to expect in terms of training, health concerns, behavior, longevity, shedding, etc. 

AGE: Are you ready to invest 10-20 years into this relationship? Or are you thinking 3-5 years is plenty of time? 

FINANCES: The adoption fee is just the beginning, folks. When you adopt from us, that fee includes spaying/neutering, microchipping, vaccinations, vet care, and any training/socializing we can do.  Be sure to review the fees for agencies in your area.

When you get them home, add in food, medical care (routine and the inevitable emergency or illness), training, vacation expenses (whether they go with you or stay behind), etc. It adds up quickly. If you are worried about money, do not adopt breeds prone to expensive health issues, like bulldogs or Great Danes.

YOUR TIME: Puppies require a ton of work on their schedule, not yours. Not a fan of midnight walks in the snow? Don’t get a puppy. On average, it will take a dog up to a year to house train. All dogs require time in training, no matter their breed or age.

Ready to make the move? Patience, Grasshopper. Right now, EVERYONE wants a pet. The good news is it is unprecedentedly competitive. For every puppy on our website, we receive dozens, or even hundreds, of applications.  But please do not give up hope!

Here are some adoption tip highlights and recommendations for you:

  1. Read the bio and listen to what it says. If the bio says “no kids,” and you have triplets, don’t apply. If it says “must be in a home with other dogs,” and you don’t have one, move on.
  2. Apply quickly. Do not wait for your significant other’s opinion. Apply, THEN tell them what you have done. You are not obligated to adopt the animal, but it’s the only way to talk with the foster and learn more about the animal (our animals all live in foster homes).
  3. BE FLEXIBLE. If you insist on only wanting a 5-pound, blue eyed female fluffy white thing under 10 weeks old, you just made your quest exponentially The more flexible you are, the more likely you are to get the right pet.
  4. Insist on something “designer” or “trendy” (like a Frenchie)? Become a foster. SHH Fosters chose the animal(s) they foster, decide who adopts them and get “first dibs” on their foster if they “fall in love.”

Let’s address the elephant in the room. Why adopt rather than buy from a breeder? You are saving lives! Thousands of animals die every year due to overpopulation.  With a foster based rescue, the foster knows the animals from heath to behavioral quirks and is motivated to facilitate the best match for you and each fur friend.  It is also VERY difficult to tell if a breeder is an ethical and responsible animal lover, or just a puppy mill solely interested in profits.

A responsible breeder has a waitlist and never has puppies waiting for adoption. A responsible breeder screens their animals for illnesses and does not breed litters with genetic issues. A responsible breeder will allow you to meet the parents, visit their facility and ask questions. If the breeder does not meet the above criteria, walk away.

Bring a fur friend into your home is a major decision with lifelong reward.  While the adoption process may take a bit longer these days, I encourage you to throw your application in.  Your decision to do will save a life and might even be yours.